Tag Archives: South Africa

Pan-Africanism & the Women’s Movement

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Pan-Africanism & the Women's Movement AWJ Issue 6_Page_01

In this sixth issue of the African Women’s Journal, we continue to keep the African Women’s Decade Alive by stopping to take stock – What has Pan-Africanism meant for the African Women’s Movement, and likewise what has the Women’s Movement meant for Pan-Africanism? Has one impacted on the other, and in what ways? These are some of the questions that are explored in this issue.

Throughout the issue, articles point to the fact that the two: Pan-Africanism and the African Women’s movements work hand in hand and are in fact, inseparable, one cannot move without the other – as Sankara asserts – both are a necessity for the triumph of the revolution.

We open the Journal with “Pan-Africanism” a poetry piece by Nebila that reflects on what Pan-Africanism is[nt] followed by a piece by Semiha who takes a critical look at the parallels between Pan-Africanism and the African Women’s Movement, and how the latter has furthered the former. Norah shares the hostile context in which FEMNET was birthed 25 years ago, and what FEMNET means to both Pan-Africanism and the women’s movement. Gbenga explores the role of new media technologies in facilitating solidarity, shrinking time and space, advancing the agenda of both movements and provides concrete recommendations for Africa’s Agenda 2063.

Tsitsi argues that Botswana remains a democracy mainly reserved for only half of its population; the men. Camalita examines the case of South Africa – as ‘Freedom Day’ is commemorated every year on the 27th of April, is there really cause to celebrate? Jamillah and Linda argue that Pan-Africanism has contributed greatly to defining what the women’s movement will be to able do for African women as it gives them a sense of common identity and operates within their context. Sara delves into the Gender dimensions in discussing and implementing development – isn’t Pan-Africanism about self-sufficiency and control over our own resources?

Access the full journal here.  Send your feedback to communication@femnet.or.ke and library@femnet.or.ke

Our Call for Abstracts for the next issue – Shaping our Collective Futures is out! Submit before 13th of September!

 

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One on One: Rosie Motene

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Rosie is an acclaimed South African actress, TV/film producer and philanthropist.She was among the climbers of Mt. Kilimanjaro from March 5th-9th as part of the Africa UNiTE Campaign to end violence against women and girls. She shared her thoughts after the climb with Nebila Abdulmelik.

Initial Thoughts?
It was tough but rewarding. An amalgamation of emotions. I didn’t conquer it, but I went as far as my body could take and came back with a lot, including friendship.

Lessons learnt?
Listen to your body. This climb demanded mind, body and soul. Spirituality gives you strength, there’s no doubt about that.

Message to fellow Africans?
We need to do this together, one step at a time.

Message to Governments?
Step up! Look around, we’re not going anywhere!